Meet the Team

We have assembled an international team of 28 scientists from seven countries to gain an integrated understanding of this large igneous province, from its origins to short-and-long-term effects on the Earth system. Our primary research focuses on climate modeling, geochronology, gravity and magnetics, paleontology.

Timing, duration, and locationUsing radiometric dating (the slow and regular decay of radioactive elements) and paleomagnetic measurements (rocks record the Earth’s magnetic field as it was when the rocks formed), these scientists are determining where Siberia was on the globe 252 million years ago, and the rates and precise dates of eruption.

Vladimir Pavlov
Principal Investigator
Inst. of Physics of the Earth, Moscow, Russia
Paleomagnetics
Principal Investigator
MIT, Cambridge, MA
U-Pb geochronology
Principal Investigator
Univ. of Leicester, Leicester, UK
Ar-Ar geochronology
Principal Investigator
Norwegian Technical U., Trondheim, Norway
Tectonic setting
Evgenii Gurevich
VNIGRI, St. Petersburg, Russia
Paleomagnetics
Sandra Kamo
Univ. of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
U-Pb geochronology
Anatoly M. Nikishin
Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia
Tectonic setting
Natalia Pravikova
Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia
Igneous petrology
Marc Reichow
Univ. of Leicester, Leicester, UK
Ar-Ar geochronology
Michael Storey
Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark
Ar-Ar geochronology
Roman Veselovskiy
Institute of Physics of the Earth, Moscow
Paleomagnetics
Benjamin Weiss
MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA
Paleomagnetics

Volatile sources for atmospheric changeCatastrophic changes in the atmosphere and ocean may have been caused by chemicals released by the magmas and by the existing crustal rocks they heated. This part of the team is measuring and calculating what the volatile release may have been.

Lead Principal Investigator
DTM, Carnegie Institution for Science, Washington, DC
Igneous petrology
Principal Investigator
University of Grenoble, Grenoble, France
Magma and crust interactions and sediment degassing
Principal Investigator
University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
Magma and crust interactions and sediment degassing
Timothy L. Grove
MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA
Experiments
Sverre Planke
University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
Magma and crust interactions and sediment degassing
Alexander Polozov
Inst. of Geochemistry, Irkutsk, Russia
Magma and crust interactions and sediment degassing
Tim White
Penn State U., University Park, PA
Coal metamorphism

Lithospheric structure and dynamicsThe lithosphere (the rigid parts of the Earth that move as plates) of Siberia was greatly changed by the flood basalt eruption. By studying the structure, magnetic and gravity fields, and composition of the lithosphere, this team will better constrain the causes and effects of large magmatic events.

Principal Investigator
MIT, Cambridge, MA
Geodynamics and Gravity
Principal Investigator
Department of Earth Science, University of Bergen
Seismology
Lev Vinnik
Inst. of Physics of the Earth, Moscow, Russia
Seismology
Mike Purucker
Goddard Space Flight Center Magnetics
Magnetic field
Richard J. Walker
University of Maryland, College Park, MD
Isotopic studies of xenoliths

Climate and EnvironmentThe volatile releases, location, and timing measured by the team are being loaded into large models of the Earth’s climate to determine whether they were sufficient to create the extinction and chemical tracers measured for that time period.

Principal Investigator
Penn State U., University Park, PA
Climate modeling
Principal Investigator
Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Paleontology
Jeff Kiehl
Nat’l Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO
Climate modeling